The UK population statistics and housing

 

UK Population on housing article

The national statistics population estimates mid-2016   revealed that the population of the UK was estimated to be 65,648,000 as of 30th June 2016.

The number of people that are resident in the UK including migrants has increased by 0.8% (538,000). That is a growth rate similar to the average annual growth rate since 2005.

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£2.3 billion investment in infrastructure for new housing in the UK

 

UK infrastructure investment uk housing.

Things are looking up for housing!

A £2.3 billion fund which could unlock 100,000 new homes in areas of high demand was launched yesterday (4th July 2017) by the Communities Secretary, Sajid Javid. It was a welcome and positive move.

At the Birmingham LGA Conference, the Communities Secretary said that the investment will help to fund vital physical infrastructure projects. Life’s necessities – the building of roads, bridges, energy networks and other utilities, the absence of which continues to delay housebuilding in the UK – preventing the government from fixing our broken housing market.
Communities Secretary, Sajid Javid, said:

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How will the Heathrow Expansion be affected by a hung parliament?

 

Heathrow Airport expansion cancelled

Conservative MPs have warned that the Heathrow expansion is ‘not going to happen’ following the hung parliament. Last week, Zac Goldsmith, the Conservative MP for Richmond tweeted – ‘Heathrow expansion… not going to happen.’

He told The Sun: “Heathrow expansion already faced huge obstacles, not least a very strong legal challenge by Local Authorities and appalling air pollution implications.”

The proposal of a third runway at Heathrow Airport could be grounded!

This is due to as many as 40 of the Prime Minister’s own MPs being against the construction of another runway at the international airport.

If the third runway doesn’t go ahead, it would be a great relief for a lot of people. There could be an end to the major concerns about air pollution, noise pollution, climate change and the destruction of communities.

Before the hung parliament, Heathrow’s third runway was potentially going to be operational by 2026, creating £60 billion of economic benefits across a 60 year period.

The plan consists of a 3,500m runway which is said to be the first full-length runway to be built in the south-east of the UK since the Second World War. The costs involved are estimated to be a staggering £18.6bn.

Last year, the government stated that the decision to approve the plan is central to the economic growth of Britain – does this mean that the have placed more value upon the economic aspect of the development and completely neglected the law and the health risks imposed on Londoners? Well, Gatwick seem to think so. Gatwick have argued that the Heathrow expansion is illegal as it is already in breach of the EU Air Quality regulations and will contribute to prolonged breaches. It therefore undermines the current law and the decision to back the proposal is “unlawful”.

Whilst a large percentage of the Prime Minister’s MPs are against the runway, Labour MPs are divided on the issue. Their election manifesto only committed the party to expand Britain’s airport capacity.

The Conservative’s manifesto stated: “We will continue our programme of strategic national investments, including High Speed 2, Northern Powerhouse Rail and the expansion of Heathrow Airport – and we will ensure that these great projects do as much as possible to develop the skills and careers of British workers.”

Theresa May backed the proposal for a third runway at the airport last year. This was a turnaround for the Conservative party that had campaigned against the extra runway in 2010. Boris Johnson, the Foreign Secretary, Justine Greening, the Education Secretary and the Mayor of London are against the development.

So there could be long delays for the extra runway at Heathrow as well as dealing with the housing crisis here in the UK due to the gamble Theresa May took by doing a snap general election on the 8th June 2017.

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Nitrogen Deposits in Ashdown Forest affects a number of Local Authorities

 

Nitrogen deposition in ashdown forest article

Ashdown Forest is an ancient area of open heathland and is an area of outstanding natural beauty. The poor condition of Ashdown Forest however has led to concerns regarding air quality and traffic generation which are starting to impact upon the planning processes of Local Authorities close to the forest. 

After three years of monitoring the area Wealden Council has expressed concerns about damage from nitrogen emissions from motor vehicles and other sources. This has led to concerns that additional housing in the area will increase nitrogen deposition alongside roads close to the Ashdown Forest special area of conservation. We therefore explore the evolving position as we understand it from surrounding Local Authority areas.

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Election results 2017 – where are we now?

 

It’s nearly a week after the hanging and the UK political landscape is changing day by day.

Theresa May is trying to conclude on-going discussions with the DUP, politicians are urging the government to prioritise Brexit negotiations to create a strong post-Brexit economy, and the Conservative Party are trying to reinvent themselves.

May has yet to finalise a deal with the DUP that would see its 10 MPs support her minority Tory government.

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The Manifesto 2017 – The Conservatives and Labour on housing

 

General Election 2017 planning policy

The Conservatives and Labour both agree that Britain has a housing crisis – a crisis of supply and a crisis of affordability. We have read through both Manifestos and extracted key proposals for housing.

Labour’s Manifesto proposed the following:

1. Promised to invest into building over a million new homes.
2. Build at least 100,000 council and housing association homes per year by the end of the next parliament.
3. Set up a new Department for Housing. The Department would have to improve the number, standards and affordability and overhaul the Homes and Communities Agency to be its housing delivery body and give councils new powers to build homes.
4. Through the National Transformation Fund, it would prioritise the building of new homes, including council homes.
5. Prioritise brownfield sites, protect the Green Belt and start work on a new generation of new towns to avoid urban sprawl.
6. Consult on new rules on minimum space standards to prevent rabbit hutch properties and on new standards for building ‘zero carbon homes’.
7. Ensure local plans addressed the need for older people’s housing, ensuring that choice and downsizing options were readily available.
8. Land registry would stay in public sector and ownership of land would become more transparent.
9. Pledged to build thousands more low-cost homes reserved for first-time buyers and guarantee Help to Buy funding until 2027, giving local first time buyers ‘first choice’ for new homes built in their area.
10. Give leaseholders security from rip-off ground rents and end the routine use of leasehold houses in new developments.
11. Suspend right-to-buy with councils only able to resume sales if they could prove they had a plan to replace homes sold like of like basis.
12. For the rental market, it would make new three year tenancies the norm, with an inflation cap on rent increases and look at giving the Mayor the power to give renters in London additional security.
13. Would legislate to ban letting agency fees for tenants.

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The Urbanissta Legal Beagle is on the case! (May’17)

 

Welcome to the Urbanissta Legal Beagle’s case law reviews – we’re tracking the decisions on proposed developments to see what precedents have been set in recent judgments and decisions that might be useful to you, day to day.

We provide a summary of recent decisions for your reference below and via the links, or you can download the full decision letters should you wish. This is month three of our updates, so remember to keep any eye out for further iterations, in the weeks to come!

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